a tale of two idiots

Discussion in 'UK Motorcycles' started by darsy, Apr 4, 2009.

  1. darsy

    darsy Guest

    1st idiot (confirmed):

    Me. Managed to get the KTM onto it's jack stand, and eventually got
    this raised. Managed to remove the rear wheel (it's simple, sort of).

    Manual says "refit rear wheel in opposite order to removal".

    Can I get it back on? Can I ****. I can't work out how the hell it
    interfaces with the brakes - no amount of twisting seems to get it in
    a position where the disk will slide between the pads, and also it's
    possible to get the wheel to align with the hub.

    2nd idiot (prospective):

    anyone daft/generous enough to volunteer to pop over and help me with
    it? Payment in booze/curry available.

    Secondary question (one for Veggie or Bonwick, maybe) - is the manual
    lying, and should I remove the brake caliper, refit the wheel and then
    re-attach the caliper?
     
    darsy, Apr 4, 2009
    #1
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  2. darsy

    ogden Guest

    Are you in a hurry? I may well be able to get over tomorrow afternoon.

    I hate refitting rear wheels solo.
     
    ogden, Apr 4, 2009
    #2
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  3. darsy

    Nige Guest

    Dont you just hate jobs that look easy that turn out to be a right ****?
    Like the thick **** i am i once had all the springs & dampers off an old
    disco in my front garden. After i took it all off & it was propped up on
    stands i realised i had meft my big socket set at a mates. I couldn't get
    either of the other cars out due to the fucking disco. I had to get a
    bastard taxi :)

    --


    Nige,

    Honda VTR1000 SOLD!
    BMW K1200S
    Range Rover Vogue
    Aprilia RSV Mille
     
    Nige, Apr 4, 2009
    #3
  4. darsy

    Andy Bonwick Guest

    Have you done the really obvious thing and forced the pads back as far
    as they'll go?
    If you haven't got it done today then I'll pop (ha) over tomorrow
    morning and help make it worse. Adie's off to the football early in
    the morning so I could be down with you before 10 if you feel so
    inclined.

    The more miles I put on the Tenere the better at the moment and it's
    only a jaunt down the A1 then along the A10 isn't it?
    Dunno. I've never removed a rear caliper to do a wheel change so my
    guess would be a no.
     
    Andy Bonwick, Apr 4, 2009
    #4
  5. darsy

    Lozzo Guest

    Removing the rear caliper from the mount is the quickest way to get a
    10R C1 rear wheel back in. Trust me, I've done it hundreds of times on
    Danny's old race bike, some of them in a mad rush to get the bike on
    the grid when swopping from wets to slicks or vice versa when it's been
    a tough call on what tyres to run. The time taken to remove and refit
    the caliper is about a quarter of the time it takes to **** around
    trying to manouver the disc between the pads and align everything with
    just two hands.

    --
    Lozzo
    Versys 650 Tourer
    Fireblade 929 (For sale)
    CBR600F-W trackbike
    SR250 SpazzTrakka,
    SR250 wivva topbox
    TS250C
    RD400F, somewhere
    I see a bright new future, where chickens can cross the road with no
    fear of having their motives questioned
     
    Lozzo, Apr 4, 2009
    #5
  6. LOL. Splendidly fuckwitted.
     
    The Older Gentleman, Apr 4, 2009
    #6
  7. If I have a bike with a centre stand, or the rear end of a side-stand
    only bike off the deck, I just hang the rear wheel from the seat with a
    couple of bungee cords looped round the seat and wheel rim.

    Makes aligning everything way easier, because you don't need to keep
    holding the wheel.
     
    The Older Gentleman, Apr 4, 2009
    #7
  8. darsy

    Nige Guest

    Superb innit. Another one, i bought a nice HD Hard drive camcorder for track
    antics. I thought i would test it out today on the bike mount. I gave the
    RSV a fucking good hammering thinking what a fucking god i was. Played it
    back at home it died as i got out of the fucking drive :)

    It has some kind of shock sensor i now read....

    So i have replaced it with an SD type.

    --


    Nige,

    Honda VTR1000 SOLD!
    BMW K1200S
    Range Rover Vogue
    Aprilia RSV Mille
     
    Nige, Apr 4, 2009
    #8
  9. darsy

    wessie Guest

    Same with the R-GS. Much easier to get the wheel aligned on the rear hub
    with the brake caliper off.
     
    wessie, Apr 4, 2009
    #9
  10. darsy

    darsy Guest

    that would be excellent, if you can.
    it's a bastard.
     
    darsy, Apr 4, 2009
    #10
  11. In message
    Saw one of those jack stands on ebay, are they any use for road bikes
    (unfaired)?

    They seem pretty cheap and it might be an alternative method to help me
    get this heavy lump of cast iron CB72 engine back in the frame. Current
    plan is get a mate in, but I think that it still might be too heavy, or
    I might buy a trolley jack.
     
    mike. buckley, Apr 4, 2009
    #11
  12. darsy

    darsy Guest

    that'd be fantastic. I'm usually up by 07:00 on a Sunday, so before 10
    is great.
    sort of - if you're coming down the A1(m), then the quickest way is
    just get on the M25 at South Mimms for a couple of junctions, leaving
    at J24 (signposted Botany Bay/Enfield) and then a couple of miles down
    the A1005 to Enfield Town. I'll pop my snailmail addy to the other
    mailing list so both you and Ogden know where I am; though if you're
    coming in the morning, probably not worth Ogden bothering to come in
    the afternoon.

    OK.
     
    darsy, Apr 4, 2009
    #12
  13. darsy

    Andy Bonwick Guest

    snip>
    I'll aim to leave Bedford at about 9am but given that I'm still being
    nice to the bike it'll be about an hour and a half before I get there.

    I'll pop a satnav in my pocket for those where the **** am I moments
    and see you whenever.
     
    Andy Bonwick, Apr 4, 2009
    #13
  14. The traditional one-body method to put an engine back in the frame is to
    lay the engine on its side and lower the frame down on to it.
     
    Grimly Curmudgeon, Apr 4, 2009
    #14
  15. darsy

    Andy Bonwick Guest

    I always used to just lump the engine into the frame then line up one
    set of holes with a big screwdriver and pivot the engine around until
    I'd got the first bolt in place. After that it's easy.
     
    Andy Bonwick, Apr 4, 2009
    #15
  16. darsy

    T i m Guest

    Had I known you were round the corner and been *absolutely* sure I
    could get it all back for you [1] I would have offered. Still happy to
    or in the future etc?

    Cheers, T i m

    [1] Rebuilt the back end of the GPZ550 and that has a rear disk
    (anything like?). Talking of the GPZ ... anyone got a decent pair of
    stanchions they wanna get rid of?
     
    T i m, Apr 4, 2009
    #16
  17. Tricky with this engine, to pivot it in you either have to remove the
    front wheel or lift the engine and get the cylinder head in it's
    mountings first, which by that time you've done the hard bit. If you
    mount the rear bolt first the cylinder head catches the front wheel as
    you pivot it up/forwards.

    You could do it sideways with the frame on its side, but I'm a bit wary
    of busting any cylinder fins.
     
    mike. buckley, Apr 4, 2009
    #17
  18. darsy

    Lozzo Guest

    It's a piece of piss if you know what you're doing.

    --
    Lozzo
    Versys 650 Tourer
    Fireblade 929 (For sale)
    CBR600F-W trackbike
    SR250 SpazzTrakka,
    SR250 wivva topbox
    TS250C
    RD400F, somewhere
    I see a bright new future, where chickens can cross the road with no
    fear of having their motives questioned
     
    Lozzo, Apr 4, 2009
    #18
  19. darsy

    Andy Bonwick Guest

    I've always managed to do them on my own and if the wheel is being
    awkward it has a bit of wood chucked under it to support it.
     
    Andy Bonwick, Apr 4, 2009
    #19
  20. darsy

    SD Guest

    <predictable>

    It's a labour of Hercules to refit a GL1500 rear with an Avon Venom on
    it.
     
    SD, Apr 4, 2009
    #20
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