Heated Gloves - mini review

Discussion in 'UK Motorcycles' started by 'Hog, Feb 12, 2006.

  1. 'Hog

    'Hog Guest

    Gerbing heated leather gloves courtesy of GLF.
    http://www.glfacc.demon.co.uk/
    Warning, it's a truly shite website.

    First up, £117 is a shed load of money for a pair on non racy type bike
    gloves I agree. Then again I've had 3 of the 50-80 pound types in 3
    years without finding truly warm hands in *any* weather (1). Once you
    have had K100/1100LT with OEM heated grips you don't want any lesser
    comfort.

    The on-bike wiring loom is easy to fit if you put it across the battery,
    as it seems to be designed. It has an inline 15A blade fuse. Just leave
    the connector somewhere handy at the tank/seat join on the left side.
    The in jacket loom needs a little thought. For starters the gloves are
    made to fit and be wired inside your sleeve. Not all jackets allow this.
    One soon decides that the wires need to be stitched/taped into place.
    Easy enough to achieve.
    If you have more than one bike/jacket go to Maplin, the power connectors
    are a standard part, collect some wire, battery terminals and inline
    blade fuses and they are easily fabricated. Requires soldering.
    As soon as you use the gloves it becomes obvious that selling them
    without an integral on/off switch or rheostat is a bit daft. It is easy
    enough to connect/disconnect as required though.

    The gloves seemed a little bulky in the palm but bedded down after only
    an hour of use. Power off they are still a very good and warm
    conventional glove. Power on, oh my giddy aunt, just like the ol' BMW
    experience once again. 0 degrees hustling on an unfaired bike was a
    pleasure. I find that with warmed hands nothing else seems too grim.

    I admit it is a slight fiddle to get connected, you aren't going to
    bother for a 15 minute dash to work. Perhaps some future whizz will come
    up with an inductive loop between the bars and gloves.

    (1) The last pair of conventional gloves
    www.londongatwickdainese.co.uk/assuan.html were the warmest and most
    weatherproof by a royal mile and I recommend them. I didn't ever want
    the pathan style jobs so didn't try them.
     
    'Hog, Feb 12, 2006
    #1
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  2. In uk.rec.motorcycles, 'Hog belched forth and ejected the following:
    One of the worst in recent memory.
    Bollocks, it's 117 quid, dunt matter if it's on gloves or some other
    shite you'll only use for a few months of the year...
    *Ding*
    Personally, I'm waiting for someone to come up with an air-conitioned
    suit I can wear in summer.
     
    Whinging Courier, Feb 12, 2006
    #2
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  3. 'Hog

    'Hog Guest

    Halversson
     
    'Hog, Feb 12, 2006
    #3
  4. 'Hog

    Suze Guest

    I have the same gloves and absolutely love them. In fact I'm now on my
    second pair as I lost one glove just before Christmas and just wouldn't
    consider replacing them with anything else.

    If you want warm hands in winter, in my opinion it's the best option.
    I've tried heated grips and similarly expensive gloves but nothing else
    compares.

    Plus, they are such terribly nice people at GLF! :)
     
    Suze, Feb 12, 2006
    #4
  5. 'Hog

    ginge Guest

    I found a car worked quite well. :)
     
    ginge, Feb 12, 2006
    #5
  6. 'Hog

    BGN Guest

    And a house.
     
    BGN, Feb 12, 2006
    #6
  7. 'Hog

    Shep© Guest

    Shep©, Feb 13, 2006
    #7
  8. In uk.rec.motorcycles, 'Hog belched forth and ejected the following:
    Are you being rude? ')

    Google's turning up buerger all in the Halversson dept.

    Nothing to do with bikes or suits anyway ;)
     
    Whinging Courier, Feb 13, 2006
    #8
  9. 'Hog

    'Hog Guest

    OK so it's Halvarssons. I was referring to the mesh summer shell for the
    www.jofama.se/motorcycle_wear/ textile stuff PV waxes lyrical about.
     
    'Hog, Feb 13, 2006
    #9
  10. 'Hog

    'Hog Guest

    LOL heated footpegs
    *nice*
     
    'Hog, Feb 13, 2006
    #10
  11. 'Hog

    Christofire Guest

    A quick-release extension loop for the cooling system would be an
    interesting idea to try. Put on the jacket with the pipework in it,
    plug into the take-offs and ride off.

    You'd need something to spread the heat, and it wouldn't need much flow
    once the engine got up to temp, but with such an obvious heat source it
    seems a shame to be generating more while there's loads there for the
    taking.
     
    Christofire, Feb 13, 2006
    #11
  12. 'Hog

    dwb Guest

    Other than cars where this is of course standard, the only 'bike' I've
    intentionally [1] seen this on was the scooter I had - you could open a
    couple of vents and the heat from the engine would come out the vent as
    you rode along (ie air flow rather than a fan).

    It surely can't be that hard to, for instance, heat the seat using the
    engine heat.


    [1] the Honda VFR I had on loan did this too - but I think that's a
    'feature' of side mounted radiators. It was certainly not welcome in
    late August heat,but was handy on a chilly morning :)
     
    dwb, Feb 13, 2006
    #12
  13. Grimly Curmudgeon, Feb 13, 2006
    #13
  14. 'Hog

    wessie Guest

    'Hog emerged from their own little world to say
    Leg warmers are standard fitment on my R-GS
    http://www.hermys.com/downloads/00R-GS02.jpg

    Not so good in the summer when riding around the Adriatic Coast.
     
    wessie, Feb 13, 2006
    #14
  15. 'Hog

    'Hog Guest

    Well yes I was just about to reply to DWB that the K100/1100LT ducts the
    hot air from the rad fan to the rider's lower legs. The R100RS does a
    decent job at lower speeds too.

    I suppose there is no good reason not to have coolant circulated through
    the handlebars and indeed the seat for that matter. It's more potential
    for leakages I suppose.
     
    'Hog, Feb 13, 2006
    #15
  16. 'Hog

    Shep© Guest

    I know a guy who fitted a side-car to a CX for his missus and then ran
    a pipe off the cooling system to a radiator in the side-car :D
     
    Shep©, Feb 13, 2006
    #16
  17. 'Hog

    Shep© Guest

    They would work but also remember the thicker the covering the less
    heat you would get through but on footpegs the covering would have to
    be robust so I would go with the 1.5 metres per grip/peg.

    1.5 metres Constantan wire per grip is really hot/2 metres is
    comfortable(low setting).On high they draw about 2amps which not a lot
    and I've changed quite a few bulbs on my bikes to LEDs to help cut
    down on the current draw on the old charging system.
     
    Shep©, Feb 13, 2006
    #17
  18. In uk.rec.motorcycles, 'Hog belched forth and ejected the following:
    When I was despatching, one of our riders had a full MotoX style vest
    with armour in it during the summer.

    It still looked hot :)

    What's needed is a suit with a miniature fridge in it that circulates
    adjustable cold air around the inside of leathers.
     
    Whinging Courier, Feb 13, 2006
    #18
  19. Odd conjunction.

    He must hate her to fit a sidecar for her; otoh, maybe he was interested
    in keeping the groceries warm. Otooh, ballast is always useful.

    Nothing can be more miserable than the interior of a sidecar in winter.

    <vivid memories of being in an unheated double adult s/c in winter while
    just a nipper>
    --
    Dave
    GS850x2 XS650 SE6a
    I demand nothing of you except that you amuse me.

    [email protected] Team UKRM
    http://vspx27.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/main.py?qtype=teampage&teamnum=47957
     
    Grimly Curmudgeon, Feb 14, 2006
    #19
  20. 'Hog

    Andy Bonwick Guest

    I wish I could remember trips in my dads sidecar but he sold it when I
    was about 2 or 3 years old and any memories are long gone. I doubt if
    it was really cold though, we'd have used trains to go anywhere if the
    weather was shit.
     
    Andy Bonwick, Feb 14, 2006
    #20
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