Strange incident on the news.

Discussion in 'Australian Motorcycles' started by krazykol, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. krazykol

    krazykol Guest

    Not quite motorcycle related, but could just have easily happened to one of
    us.

    On a local news report there was the story of a rear ender (which I happened
    passed on the way home from work) where someone was stopped in a passing
    lane to turn right accross double white lines into a driveway and was
    smashed into from behind by someone using the over taking lane for (oh my
    god how dare they) over taking (a truck) and would have not been able to see
    her before pulling out. I know the spot well and he would have had little to
    no chance of seeing her in advance. Now the news lady made a big song and
    dance about (mostly because the police officer who was interviewed did) how
    the guy doing the over taking was being charged with reckless use of a
    vehicle. Mean while nothing was said about the lady stopped in the passing
    lane (did I mention on the Bruce Highway) being charged with anything at
    all. Now surely (and I'm not involved in law inforcement so I have only
    (what little) common sense I have) she should have been charge with at least
    half a dozen offenses (far more than the poor barstard who hit her)?

    Does anyone have any idea how this would have played out in states other
    than the insanity state (Qld)?

    Krazykol
    Firestorm
     
    krazykol, Dec 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. krazykol

    Nev.. Guest

    Also in Victoria, just to be different to everyone else, where it is
    permissible to turn across double lines into a driveway, there is a
    break in the double white lines to indicate this, so the 'no crossing
    double lines' rule has no exceptions.

    Nev..
    '04 CBR1100XX
     
    Nev.., Dec 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. krazykol

    smack Guest

    Sections 150 and 27 of the Queensland Road Rules (PDF, 2.87mb*) apply.

    What does a continuous white single centre line mean?
    A continuous white single centre line (dividing line) may be crossed to
    enter or leave the road and when turning to or from property. You must not
    overtake across this line.
     
    smack, Dec 4, 2006
    #3
  4. krazykol

    Dale Porter Guest

    In Victoria a single continuous white centre line is simply a means to divide directions. A driver is permitted to overtake to the
    right of the centre dividing line.

    Rules 132(2) & 134(2)

    http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/vrpdf/randl/part_11.pdf
     
    Dale Porter, Dec 4, 2006
    #4
  5. krazykol

    justAL Guest

    Just goes to show how close this guy was to the back of the truck.

    justAL
     
    justAL, Dec 4, 2006
    #5
  6. krazykol

    smack Guest

    134(3) says if it's a double unbroken, then you can't cross it. Nev wins
     
    smack, Dec 4, 2006
    #6
  7. krazykol

    F Murtz Guest

    Turning right over two lines IS to enter your driveway. you lose
     
    F Murtz, Dec 4, 2006
    #7
  8. krazykol

    Dale Porter Guest


    So the big question is, why the hell did he pull out from behind the truck when he did not have a clear view. Too impatient to wait
    till he had a better view? Certainly sounds like a careless maneuver on his part.
     
    Dale Porter, Dec 4, 2006
    #8
  9. krazykol

    Nev.. Guest

    Because he didn't expect there to be a stationary vehicle in the
    overtaking lane.

    Nev..
    '04 CBR1100XX
     
    Nev.., Dec 4, 2006
    #9
  10. krazykol

    smack Guest

    When I was a lad you could cross DOUBLE unbroken to get to a driveway, but
    the wording above says SINGLE continous white line. So I'm waiting for
    clarification on that.
     
    smack, Dec 5, 2006
    #10
  11. krazykol

    Dale Porter Guest

    Which is exactly why he should have waited till he had a clear view.
     
    Dale Porter, Dec 5, 2006
    #11
  12. krazykol

    Dale Porter Guest

    Read the .pdf document smack. It's right there. In Vic you may cross a single continuous white line, but not double continuous white
    lines.

    And as stated earlier in the thread by Nev.......
     
    Dale Porter, Dec 5, 2006
    #12
  13. krazykol

    G-S Guest

    Ummm unless the law has changed it isn't legal... they put breaks in
    double lines for driveways where people need to do what you are talking
    about.


    No break, then no entry to the driveway.


    G-S
     
    G-S, Dec 5, 2006
    #13
  14. krazykol

    G-S Guest

    One could argue that he pulled out in order to 'obtain' a clear view.

    G-S
     
    G-S, Dec 5, 2006
    #14
  15. krazykol

    Dale Porter Guest

    If he was in a LHD vehicle then I could understand it to a degree. But it doesn't take much movement to the right to get a much
    clearer view in an RHD vehicle.
     
    Dale Porter, Dec 5, 2006
    #15
  16. In aus.motorcycles on Tue, 05 Dec 2006 18:28:36 +1100
    Rule 134
    (3) If the dividing line is not 2 parallel continuous dividing
    lines,
    the driver may drive to the right of the dividing line:
    (a) to enter or leave the road; or

    That's the Oz road rules, I don't think any of the states have decided
    to ditch that one.

    Zebee
     
    Zebee Johnstone, Dec 5, 2006
    #16
  17. krazykol

    Nev.. Guest

    Yeah, you just have to move out far enough to hit a parked car
    apparently. :)

    Nev..
    '04 CBR1100XX
     
    Nev.., Dec 5, 2006
    #17
  18. krazykol

    G-S Guest

    So when it _is_ 2 parallel continuous driving lines one may not (which
    is the same as 'no break then no entry').

    G-S
     
    G-S, Dec 6, 2006
    #18
  19. In aus.motorcycles on Wed, 06 Dec 2006 21:06:55 +1100
    exactly. I was agreeing with you :)

    Zebee
     
    Zebee Johnstone, Dec 6, 2006
    #19
  20. krazykol

    G-S Guest

    oh.... ok....
    (not used to that type look) :)

    G-S
     
    G-S, Dec 7, 2006
    #20
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