What is the correct way to measure float height on a CB450?

Discussion in 'Motorbike Technical Discussion' started by none, Jun 27, 2006.

  1. none

    none Guest

    I followed the directions given in the Intertec manual which were to
    bend the tang until 20mm was measured from the gasket surface to the
    bottom of the float (with the needle valve closed) but I obviously
    misunderstood the directions because after I got done doing that then
    there was no fuel flow at all into the carb bowl. If someone could
    clarify this procedure I would be greatly appreciative.
    Thanks, Mark
     
    none, Jun 27, 2006
    #1
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  2. You need to have the carb inverted to measure this gap. If you set the
    gap with the carb right way up, this would certainly cut off the fuel
    flow.
     
    The Older Gentleman, Jun 27, 2006
    #2
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  3. none

    none Guest

    Sorry for not being more descriptive in my post. The carbs were off &
    inverted when the measurements were made. Here are the directions from
    the Intertec manual (reprinted without permission) "Float height from
    gasket surface of carb body should be 20mm with fuel inlet needle valve
    closed". These directions are not too explicit for an amateur like me.
     
    none, Jun 27, 2006
    #3

  4. Ah. Stuck valve?
     
    The Older Gentleman, Jun 27, 2006
    #4
  5. none

    John Johnson Guest

    Did you have the gasket in or out when you measured?

    --
    Later,
    John



    'indiana' is a 'nolnn' and 'hoosier' is a 'solkk'. Indiana doesn't solkk.
     
    John Johnson, Jun 27, 2006
    #5
  6. none

    none Guest

    Thank you for supplying more detailed directions than Intertec. Their
    carb blow-up pictures are very good though.
     
    none, Jun 27, 2006
    #6
  7. none

    none Guest

    gasket was in

     
    none, Jun 27, 2006
    #7
  8. none

    ken Booth Guest

    Try this

    I found this on another site but its worth passing on. Get a short length of
    clear plastic tube that will fit over the carb drain outlet and bend it up
    the side of the carb. Undo the drain screw with the petrol turned on and it
    will stop at the level of the fuel in the float chamber. So you have a
    measurement to the carb base for the level in the float chamber

    Ken
     
    ken Booth, Jun 28, 2006
    #8

  9. You know, that is an utter gem.
     
    The Older Gentleman, Jun 29, 2006
    #9
  10. *Snort*

    I wish I could recall all the bodges that people have done to their own
    bikes, which I subsequentrly bought from them.

    My favourites, all from personal experience:

    1. The man who used carpet underlay as an air filter element on his
    GT380.

    2. The utter imbecile who, after he'd stripped the heads off two of the
    four bolts holding down his handlebars onto the top yoke, left one
    unrepaired and glued the other bolt head back with epoxy resin.

    3. The lunatic who squeezed a 19" inner tube into the 18" back tyre of a
    Honda CB500T b y folding it over. I sold the bike to a mate, and the
    inner tube exploded in France. Of course I hadn't checked. I mean, the
    tyre was nearly new, and who checks to see that some dork has put the
    wrong inner tube in it?

    4. The man who put a pair of tights (panty-hose, for you Americans)
    stretched across the air intake horn of a Morini 500 (quite recent,
    that)

    5. The man who rebuilt the top end of his Honda CD175 with a new
    camchain and routed the chain on the wrong side of the jockey wheel
    tensioner so it wasn't tensioned at all. And he wondered why it rattled.

    6. The suicide merchant who wrapped tinfoil around the pivot pins of his
    Honda CB175's front brake to compensate for the worn brake shoes.

    7. The genius who removed the rectifier entirely from the DT50MX I
    bought for my son, bridging the gap with a wire, and relying on the
    regulator on its own. Amazingly, it worked. For a while.

    8. The electrical ignoramus who built his own reg.rec for a Suzuki GT500
    twin, which worked fine until the battery got too old and then it
    couldn't cope and caught fire.

    And so it goes.
     
    The Older Gentleman, Jun 29, 2006
    #10
  11. But only on Hondas, not BMWs, IIRC.
     
    The Older Gentleman, Jun 30, 2006
    #11
  12. none

    olsonm3915 Guest

    Q: Is a rectifier really necessary?
    A: Opinion is divided on the subject," says Rum. "All the other
    captains say it is, and I say it ain't."
     
    olsonm3915, Jun 30, 2006
    #12
  13. That was shimming handlebar clamps, was it not?

    --
    Ivan Reid, Electronic & Computer Engineering, ___ CMS Collaboration,
    Brunel University. [email protected][brunel.ac.uk|cern.ch] Room 40-1-B12, CERN
    GSX600F, RG250WD "You Porsche. Me pass!" DoD #484 JKLO#003, 005
    WP7# 3000 LC Unit #2368 (tinlc) UKMC#00009 BOTAFOT#16 UKRMMA#7 (Hon)
    KotPT -- "for stupidity above and beyond the call of duty".
     
    Dr Ivan D. Reid, Jun 30, 2006
    #13
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